oldblueeyes:

Neil Armstrong: A giant among men. (x)

(via jtotheizzoe)

jtotheizzoe:

Rockin’ Moon
Tomorrow marks the second full moon in the calendar month of August, known as a “blue moon”.  It’s not really that rare an event, as we discussed yesterday when talking about “other” full moons … sort of. It’s definitely part of American folklore, though, thanks to its romantic musical history.
I was reminded by the great Phil Plait of an interesting fact about full moons. We know that the Moon is “tidally locked” to Earth, always showing the same face since its rotation matches our own. But it’s not perfect. Thanks to a something called lunar libration, the Moon sort of oscillates in its elliptical orbit, and we are able to see slightly more than half its face throughout the year.
It’s illustrated in the GIF above (an even better one here that was too big to post), but if you want to see some HD video action showing you the phase of the moon in every hour of 2012, take a deep breath and head over to the Bad Astronomy blog.
(via Discover Magazine, image via Wikipedia)

jtotheizzoe:

Rockin’ Moon

Tomorrow marks the second full moon in the calendar month of August, known as a “blue moon”.  It’s not really that rare an event, as we discussed yesterday when talking about “other” full moons … sort of. It’s definitely part of American folklore, though, thanks to its romantic musical history.

I was reminded by the great Phil Plait of an interesting fact about full moons. We know that the Moon is “tidally locked” to Earth, always showing the same face since its rotation matches our own. But it’s not perfect. Thanks to a something called lunar libration, the Moon sort of oscillates in its elliptical orbit, and we are able to see slightly more than half its face throughout the year.

It’s illustrated in the GIF above (an even better one here that was too big to post), but if you want to see some HD video action showing you the phase of the moon in every hour of 2012, take a deep breath and head over to the Bad Astronomy blog.

(via Discover Magazine, image via Wikipedia)

Britney Spears Tweets at Mars Rover, Curiosity Prefers Anthrax

itsfullofstars:

A couple of days ago, Britney Spears tweeted at Curiosity — NASA’s radioisotope-powered Martian space rover — “So @MarsCuriosity… does Mars look the same as it did in 2000?” She then linked to her video for “Oops!… I Did It Again,” which takes place on, of course, Mars. The $2.5 billion piece of electronics was actually kind enough to reply, “Hey Brit Brit. Mars is still looking good. Maybe someday an astronaut will bring me a gift, too. Drill bits crossed ;).” Adorable! But the rover might not be as keen on “Brit Brit” as it lets on.

As revealed in an AMA session with the “engineers and scientists on the Mars Curiosity Rover Mission” here (via Business Insider), the rover listens to a variety of classic rock and metal (even Anthrax), but no Britney Spears. Apparently, the scientists operating the rover like to send it themed wake-up songs, which have ranged from the Beatles to showtunes to Wagner. Check out the full Martian soundtrack below.

Sol 2: The Beatles, “Good Morning Good Morning” 
Sol 3: Singin’ in the Rain, “Good Morning” 
Sol 5: Richard Wagner, “The Ride of the Valkyries,” and the R10 [software upgrade] victory song: Theme From “Mission: Impossible” 
Sol 6: Anthrax’s “Got the Time” and 30 Seconds to Mars’ “Echelon” 
Sol 7: The Doors, “Break on Through”, and George Harrison’s “Got My Mind Set on You” 
Sol 8: John Williams, Star Wars Theme 
Sol 9: Simon and Garfunkel, “Wake Up Little Susie”
Sol 10: Frank Sinatra, “Come Fly With Me”

Source.

jtotheizzoe:

Perseids Meteor Shower Composite
This long exposure shot by David Kingham as a friendly reminder that we are orbiting the Sun at 67,000 miles per hour, rocketing around the center of the Milky Way at 490,000 miles per hour, and traveling towards the constellation Leo at a blistering 390 kilometers per second.
That means that we happen to pass through the thin, dusty tails of comets long passed, like Swift-Tuttle, the Perseids’ source, we shouldn’t be surprised to see a few fireworks.
We’re really moving, folks.
(via kottke)

jtotheizzoe:

Perseids Meteor Shower Composite

This long exposure shot by David Kingham as a friendly reminder that we are orbiting the Sun at 67,000 miles per hour, rocketing around the center of the Milky Way at 490,000 miles per hour, and traveling towards the constellation Leo at a blistering 390 kilometers per second.

That means that we happen to pass through the thin, dusty tails of comets long passed, like Swift-Tuttle, the Perseids’ source, we shouldn’t be surprised to see a few fireworks.

We’re really moving, folks.

(via kottke)

itsfullofstars:

On August 5, NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover will touch down on the surface of the Red Planet. Or that’s what we all hope, because it will be the craziest landing in the history of space exploration.

ianbrooks:

Bodies in Space by Nathan Hoste

Nathan’s series depicts the various and scientifically accurate ways a body will succumb to the sweet embrace of death when exposed to the near-vacuum of space; from radiation sunburn to rapid decompression. More importantly, and this is something I’ve always believed, when faced with the grandeur of the Universe and simultaneously your own imminent demise, you experience an overpowering desire to inexplicably remove all of your clothes. It’s science. Prints available at etsy or Nathan’s shop.

Artist: website / inprnt

(via itsfullofstars)

Tags: dat art space

itsfullofstars:

xkcd.com presentes this image that shows all known planets, including those in our solar system. Click image for larger version.

itsfullofstars:

xkcd.com presentes this image that shows all known planets, including those in our solar system. Click image for larger version.

strictlyastronomy:

Venus Transit in hydrogen alpha light, 5 June 2012
(Credit & copyright: Gilbert A. Esquerdo)

strictlyastronomy:

Venus Transit in hydrogen alpha light, 5 June 2012

(Credit & copyright: Gilbert A. Esquerdo)

(via itsfullofstars)

(via hyuuman)